I suggest you ...

allow attorneys to upload their pacer documents

Attorneys currently have millions of pacer documents they have downloaded to their office servers of there own cases for the past few years. Is there a way you can allow attorneys to share these public documents that they have already downloaded prior to Recap starting?

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    anonymousanonymous shared this idea  ·   ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →

    12 comments

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      • Aaron GreenspanAaron Greenspan commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Anyone with a PlainSite (http://www.plainsite.org) account (they're free, you just need a verifiable e-mail address) can upload documents to dockets. PlainSite uses RECAP as a back-end for much of its content. Unfortunately, we can't pass documents back to RECAP yet, but they'll at least be indexable on the web and easy to find.

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        A good idea, but documents could be faked. The blue stamp is just a standard font pasted as a header, it can easily be modified. I don't know why anyone would do such a thing, but people vandalize wikipedia too.

      • Zachary LymZachary Lym commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Also, just having a REST API for this would make it so others could have done this already. Bonus: create a most-wanted GET feed.

      • Zachary LymZachary Lym commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @Anon "If I write a motion or brief, I'm using my own words and offering my own interpretation of the law so that's my work-product." There is no way that these are NOT public domain or at least fair-use. If they were, how could DOJ justify charging per page without cutting you in?

      • BoulderlawBoulderlaw commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        The documents could be validated by matching the attorney of record's email address with the address on the docket.

        Also, opposing counsel could be notified when a document is uploaded in an active case, which would allow the adversarial process to police attempts at forgery.

      • A_MeyerA_Meyer commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        This really needs to be done. What about a web based portal for attorneys and litigants to upload their pacer documents? I'm envisioning a two step process. The first step would be a mandatory upload of the case docket. The second step would then be the actual uploading of documents for that case. If the uploaded docket could be parsed, perhaps the webpage would reformat it with clickable docket numbers, which when clicked would allow for the uploading of that particular document or subdocument. Alternatively, if the docket could not be parsed, maybe the web page could present a series of mandatory fields to be completed prior to allowing for the actual file uploads.

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        as of rit now, there are about a dozen better ways to share your documents online than use Recap...Google Drive, Dropbox, Skydrive...hell, you could just make your own website in Google Sites or something similar and it would be better than this crap.

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @sjschultze: Well, if you aren't paying for the PACER service because you claim you fall under one if the government's categories, then why should you be allowed to distribute them to everyone? Also, I disagree that none of it is copyrightable. If I write a motion or brief, I'm using my own words and offering my own interpretation of the law so that's my work-product.

      • sjschultzesjschultze commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @Peter_from_NYC: If you are a fee-exempt user, the AO claims that, "PACER customers must refrain from the use of RECAP." They claim that these non-copyrightable public domain documents which constitute the law may not be redistributed due to a contract-like restriction imposed when you received the fee waiver.

      • Peter_from_NYCPeter_from_NYC commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        I'm a Pro Se Litigant. I'd like to upload my documents, which number in the hundreds, however I am a bit concerned about fidelity / authenticity.
        I guess the easiest way is to re-download them, but I'd appreciate some views on this.

      • Nancy_GENancy_GE commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Add my vote to this. Like Elvey, I'm not an attorney but a researcher and have my own PACER account with hundreds of court documents I would happily donate.

      • ElveyElvey commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        I was wondering the same thing. (I'm a class action plaintiff with a PACER account, not an attorney, and have most of the filings in my case.)

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